Connecting the Dots: The Practice of Oral Narration in the Lower School

Friday, June 26 | 10:30-11:15am

  • Grammar School

Narrating is not the work of a parrot, but of absorbing into oneself the
beautiful thought from the book, making it one’s own and then giving it
forth again with just that little touch that comes from one’s own mind.

-Charlotte Mason

We are all storytellers. We tell stories every day in our jobs, in our conversations at the grocery store, and with our friends. Children love to tell stories. They are excited to share their ideas and all of their experiences seem worthy of a discussion. In this session, you will hear how I’ve used flannel boards and story pieces to practice narration – the art of telling, with my students. My students have become confident storytellers through the practice of oral narrations. They listen to a variety of stories, create their pieces, organize their thoughts, and tell the story in their own words. Oral narration reinforces reading skills such as fluency, beginning, middle, and end, setting, and characterization. It has allowed my students to express themselves and to practice communicating with others effectively. They are connecting the dots to become better listeners, thinkers, and speakers.

Download Handout

Valerie Rennie

Valerie Rennie is a Kindergarten teacher at Trinity Academy in Raleigh, North Carolina. She has a bachelor's degree in elementary education and a master's degree in educational technology. She has taught grades Kindergarten through 3rd grade. She has a passion for Classical Christian education because she has seen how it has transformed the lives of her two boys, both Trinity graduates. When she isn't with her favorite 5-year olds, she enjoys reading, listening to music, drinking coffee, and spending time with her family.